Close

April 17, 2019

IRA Withdrawals That Escape the 10% Penalty

IRA

The list of these options has grown.

Provided by Stan Evans, CFP

An IRA, or Individual Retirement Account, is a tax-advantaged savings account that is subject to special rules regarding contributions and withdrawals. One of the central rules of IRAs is that withdrawals prior to age 59½ are generally subject to a tax penalty because policymakers sought to create a disincentive to use these savings for anything other than retirement.1

Yet, policymakers acknowledged that extenuating circumstances might require access to these savings prior to one’s second act. In appreciation of this, the list of exceptions for waiving this penalty has grown over the years.

Penalty-Free Withdrawals. Outlined below are the circumstances under which individuals may withdraw from an IRA prior to age 59½, without a tax penalty. Ordinary income tax, however, is generally due on such distributions.1

Death – If you die prior to age 59½, the beneficiary(ies) of your IRA may withdraw the assets without penalty. However, if your beneficiary decides to roll it over into their IRA, they will forfeit this exception.

Disability – Disability is defined as being unable to engage in any gainful employment because of a mental or physical disability, as determined by a physician.

Substantially Equal Periodic Payments – You are permitted to take a series of substantially equal periodic payments and avoid the tax penalty, provided they continue until you turn 59½ or for five years, whichever is later. The calculation of such payments is complicated, and individuals should consider speaking with a qualified tax professional.

Home Purchase – You may withdraw up to $10,000 toward the purchase of your first home ($20,000 for a married couple). You cannot have owned a home within the last two years.

Unreimbursed Medical Expenses – This exception covers medical expenses in excess of 10% of your adjusted gross income.

Health Insurance – After a job loss, there are rules in place that allow the purchasing of health insurance, penalty free.

Higher-Education Expenses – Funds may be used to cover higher-education expenses, such as tuition, student fees, textbooks, supplies, and equipment. Only certain institutions and associated expenses are permitted.

Active Duty Call-Up – Reservists who make an IRA withdrawal during a period of active duty of 180 days or longer do not have to pay a 10% early withdrawal penalty.2,3,4

As always, be sure to speak with a tax professional about your specific situation.

 

Stan Evans may be reached at 410.821.2920 or evans.stan@pmlmail.com.
www.CapitalFinancialMaryland.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

With an IRA, once you reach age 70½, generally you are obligated to begin taking required minimum distributions.

Your required minimum distribution (RMD) may be based on your age or the deceased’s age at the time of death. Penalties may occur for missed RMDs. Most are required to begin by December 31 of the year following the date of death. Any RMDs due for the original owner must be taken by their deadlines to avoid penalties. You will pay taxes on any distributions you take. Consider speaking with a financial professional who can help you evaluate the potential impact an inheritance might have on your overall tax situations.

The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Federal and state laws and regulations are subject to change, which may have an impact on after-tax investment returns. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation.

The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties.

Registered Representative of and Securities and Investment Advisory Services offered through Hornor, Townsend & Kent, LLC., Registered Investment Advisor Member FINRA/SIPC.  4 North Park Drive, Suite 400, Hunt Valley, MD 21030 410.821.2920, Capital Financial Benefit Solutions LLC and other listed entities are unaffiliated with Hornor, Townsend, & Kent, LLC.

HTK Does not provide tax or legal advice – please talk to the proper professional regarding your situation.
A5RM-Mar21


Citations.

1 – https://www.marketwatch.com/story/gearing-up-for-retirement-make-sure-you-understand-your-tax-obligations-2018-06-14 [6/14/18]
2 – https://www.investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/102815/rules-rmds-ira-beneficiaries.asp [2/21/18]
3 – https://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/slideshows/ways-to-avoid-the-ira-early-withdrawal-penalty [11/7/18]
4 – https://www.investopedia.com/articles/retirement/02/112602.asp [10/7/18]